Aspirations

"We cannot create what we can't imagine."
—lucille clifton

The Biosphere

1.

An adaptable economy that balances solidarity & autonomy, and prioritizes the flourishing of diverse forms of life.

Economic resilience generally refers to the ability of an economy to absorb or rebound from shock. Research suggests that economic and industrial diversity may be better able to maintain stability in the face of negative shock, on the other hand more specialized (i.e., less diverse) economies are at times more optimal during good times due to “economies of scale, greater access to industry-specific inputs (such as a trained workforce) and better access to shared markets”. Economic diversity can come at a cost in ‘normal periods’. Here we suggest that what the planet needs are adaptable economies, that can respond to present times, modes and unexpected conditions. Moreover, we strive for economies that are able to account for externalities and ensure to priority biodiversity, variance & abundance of life.

2.

Planetary infrastructures that allow for collective action and coordination on a global level.

We strive for structures that allow humans to collectively govern this planet and their species in a manner that transcends zero sum games such as nation states that serve to be in competition with each other. A world parliament of sorts can provide the representative legitimacy and the planetary perspective required for developing world social systems and thrival. We aspire to cultivate a sense of global citizenship as well as the conditions for human collective governances such that we all have a say in our collective futures.

3.

Support for the exploration of new self determined spaces and societies in ways that are of interest to humanity at large in harmony with the planet as a whole.

We strive for collectively supported ways to explore new societal structures in ways that are affinity and mutual benefit for the rest of humanity. Cultural evolution relies on exploration of new modes of being and we strive for space and socially reinforced modes for such exploration, that not only provide a forum for studying social forms but also aims to ensure that no dominant modes can monopolise human civilisation.

4.

A universal bundle of rights & shared agreements for humans and nature that reinforces the flourishing of all life forms over multiple time frames.

We strive for rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world, from birth until death, that apply regardless of where you are from, what you believe or how you choose to live your life, but also that only prioritize individual freedoms where these are in accordance with ecosystem viability and well being, and where one’s present day freedom does not.

Universal access to well being & thrival

5.

Universal access to services throughout our lives.

We strive for rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world, from birth until death, that apply regardless of where you are from, what you believe or how you choose to live your life, but also that only prioritize individual freedoms where these are in accordance with ecosystem viability and well being, and where one’s present day freedom does not. These include universal access to health, housing, water, sustenance, energy, transport, internet, communication and education.

6.

Systems of justice that center on harm prevention and the promotion of care, rehabilitation, and education, that does not seek to respond to violence with violence.

We want a society that centers collective freedom and justice over profit and punishment. Carceral systems do not provide adequate housing, proper mental health treatment or the means to a good life. Nor do punitive systems keep us safe. We strive for a world where we focus our energy on harm prevention, through ensuring that all humans have access to what they need. We aspire to forms of transformative justice for responding to social harms, such that the circumstances that led to harm are transformed at the core.

7.

Freedom from involuntary labour for human and animal life forms where possible.

The right to work has dominated our political imaginaries (from so-called “right to work” policies, to political platforms of “job creation,” economic security has tended to be unquestioningly tied to employment), but also the very landscapes in which we live our lives. We strive for a total rethinking of the existing spatial organization of society, since contemporary cities are designed with one particular universal in mind: the pervasiveness of work. At the same time, the history of humanity has been one of dependence on animal labour, from agriculture to war. We strive for a world that transcends this dynamic once and for all.

The Sociosphere

8.

A world where all humans are valued, irrespective of age, phenotype, form or identity, where our histories need not determine nor limit access to our futures.

The right to work has dominated our political imaginaries (from so-called “right to work” policies, to political platforms of “job creation,” economic security has tended to be unquestioningly tied to employment), but also the very landscapes in which we live our lives. We strive for a total rethinking of the existing spatial organization of society, since contemporary cities are designed with one particular universal in mind: the pervasiveness of work. At the same time, the history of humanity has been one of dependence on animal labour, from agriculture to war. We strive for a world that transcends this dynamic once and for all.

9.

Collective and mutually assured autonomy - A world in which individual and collective self-determination is the foundation for coordination between and amongst the species.

The right to work has dominated our political imaginaries (from so-called “right to work” policies, to political platforms of “job creation,” economic security has tended to be unquestioningly tied to employment), but also the very landscapes in which we live our lives. We strive for a total rethinking of the existing spatial organization of society, since contemporary cities are designed with one particular universal in mind: the pervasiveness of work. At the same time, the history of humanity has been one of dependence on animal labour, from agriculture to war. We strive for a world that transcends this dynamic once and for all.

10.

The right and means to a good life, irrespective of one’s ability to contribute. The focus of just distribution of goods and services minimises the gap with the “have-mores” and “have-lesses”.

The right to work has dominated our political imaginaries (from so-called “right to work” policies, to political platforms of “job creation,” economic security has tended to be unquestioningly tied to employment), but also the very landscapes in which we live our lives. We strive for a total rethinking of the existing spatial organization of society, since contemporary cities are designed with one particular universal in mind: the pervasiveness of work. At the same time, the history of humanity has been one of dependence on animal labour, from agriculture to war. We strive for a world that transcends this dynamic once and for all.